What we learned on day 1 of Re:2020

Karen and Mark joined the first day of re:2020 to soak up new insights and be part of this engaged, inspiring community. This is what they picked up o…

re2020 remake

Karen and Mark joined the first day of re:2020 to soak up new insights and be part of this engaged, inspiring community. This is what they picked up on day 1.

Warm data

The first talk of the day was by Bec Scott (Melbourne), founder of STREAT, who is a big promoter of relationship-based innovation opposed to non-disclosure agreements to have information flow freely and have a bigger chance of ideas growing into tangible solutions. This way of working enables the creation of ‘warm data’, which is relational information in a particular context and enables you to understand complex problems. Basically, it is all about how we show up when something is broken.

Question assumptions

Elbert Or, calling in from Manilla, showed a case study on how he helped school children getting access to education during Covid. It took lot of empathy and listening to teachers, kids, parents and the government after which they found an online-offline hybrid solution to include everyone. He never thought he could be part of the solution until he consciously looked at the problem with compassion and empathy. Now he always shows up asking: “How can I help?” and questions assumption.

In between talks the participants were put into smaller break-out rooms to meet others or to discuss a topic, which made the learning experience interesting and networking easy.

Learn to empathize

Third speaker ShuFen Lin taught us that empathy can be developed. Humans are hardwired to judge, for quick decision making, but when we apply a discovery mindset we can break that. She is also a protagonist of the idea that failures need to be celebrated as learning opportunities.

Reinvent innovation

While today’s host Kate Okrasinski (MAKE Studios) tied the talks together, we went on to the last speaker of the day: Raiyo Nariman (Kuala Lumpur). He has been in business innovation for long enough to realise it needs to be reinvented. His philosophy is that a pathway of translating an idea into a product os service that creates value, which turns into a vision after which a strategy will lead the tactics. He firmly believes that while working on innovation, you should stay away from business as usual, as that is killing for the innovation process.

This Is Service Design Doing

We had an amazing, insightful, fun and engaging first day of re:2020, which even had some live music during the lunch break and we are looking forward to Day 2, a day packed with learning from Adam Lawrence, co-author of This Is Service Design Doing! Check out more on the re:2020 website, re:2020 Instagram, re:2020 Facebook, and re:2020 LinkedIn.

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